Optical Sciences

Biomolecules and nanostructures

The Optical Sciences group studies the interaction of light and matter at the nanoscale. We do this by exploring ways to shape light and its environment. It's what we call active and passive control. Our current focus is on the interaction of light with biomolecules and nanostructures. We are part of Twente University's Department of Science and Technology and member of the MESA+ institute.
We participate in the EU-COST actions MP1102: Coherent Raman microscopy (MicroCor) and CM1202: Supramolecular photocatalytic water splitting (PERSPECT-H2O)

 

Photoplastic near-field optical probe with sub-100 nm aperture made by replication from a nanomould

(full pdf)

Kim GM, Kim BJ, Ten Have ES, Segerink F, Van Hulst NF, Brugger J
JOURNAL OF MICROSCOPY-OXFORD
vol 209: p267-p271 part 3 MAR 2003

Polymers have the ability to conform to surface contours down to a few nanometres. We studied the filling of transparent epoxy-type EPON SU-8 into nanoscale apertures made in a thin metal film as a new method for polymer/metal near-field optical structures. Mould replica processes combining silicon micromachining with the photo-curable SU-8 offer great potential for low-cost nanostructure fabrication. In addition to offering a route for mass production, the transparent pyramidal probes are expected to improve light transmission thanks to a wider geometry near the aperture. By combining silicon MEMS, mould geometry tuning by oxidation, anti-adhesion coating by self-assembled monolayer and mechanical release steps, we propose an advanced method for near-field optical probe fabrication. The major improvement is the possibility to fabricate nanoscale apertures directly o­n wafer scale during the microfabrication process and not o­n free-standing tips. Optical measurements were performed with the fabricated probes. The full width half maximum after a Gaussian fit of the intensity profile indicates a lateral optical resolution of approximate to 60 nm.
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