Optical Sciences

Biomolecules and nanostructures

The Optical Sciences group studies the interaction of light and matter at the nanoscale. We do this by exploring ways to shape light and its environment. It's what we call active and passive control. Our current focus is on the interaction of light with biomolecules and nanostructures. We are part of Twente University's Department of Science and Technology and member of the MESA+ institute.
We participate in the EU-COST actions MP1102: Coherent Raman microscopy (MicroCor) and CM1202: Supramolecular photocatalytic water splitting (PERSPECT-H2O)

 

DETECTION OF INSITU HYBRIDIZATION TO HUMAN-CHROMOSOMES WITH THE ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPE


PUTMAN CAJ, DEGROOTH BG, WIEGANT J, RAAP AK, VANDERWERF KO, VANHULST NF, GREVE J
CYTOMETRY
vol 14 issue 4: p356-p361 1993

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) permits o­ne to generate a topographic representation of the sample under investigation with high spatial resolution. We assumed that cytochemical staining techniques, which yield reaction products which can be discriminated from the surrounding material o­n basis of their topographic properties, would be applicable in AFM. Here we show the validity of this assumption by employing an in situ hybridization technique in which the final label was the precipitated product of a peroxidase/diaminebenzidine reaction. After hybridization of the DNA probe pUC1.77 that recognizes the heterochromatic region of human chromosome 1 (1q12), the AFM clearly detects the sites of in situ hybridization. In situ hybridization with DNA probe p1-79 results in clear marking of the telomere region 1p36. The diameter of the probe p1-79 linked reaction product was 75-100 nm, indicating that resolution of 200 nm can readily be reached with this AFM approach of DNA mapping. This precision is directly linked with the amount of precipitated material.
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