Optical Sciences

Biomolecules and nanostructures

The Optical Sciences group studies the interaction of light and matter at the nanoscale. We do this by exploring ways to shape light and its environment. It's what we call active and passive control. Our current focus is on the interaction of light with biomolecules and nanostructures. We are part of Twente University's Department of Science and Technology and member of the MESA+ institute.
We participate in the EU-COST actions MP1102: Coherent Raman microscopy (MicroCor) and CM1202: Supramolecular photocatalytic water splitting (PERSPECT-H2O)

 

POLY(DIACETYLENE) MONOLAYERS STUDIED WITH A FLUORESCENCE SCANNING NEAR-FIELD OPTICAL MICROSCOPE


MOERS MHP, GAUB HE, VANHULST NF
LANGMUIR
vol 10 issue 8: p2774-p2777 AUG 1994

A novel and powerful method to study the optical properties of thin lipid films which a resolution superior to confocal microscopy is presented. With a scanning near-field optical microscope, fluorescence images of a Langmuir-Blodgett film of diethylene glycol diamine pentacosadiynoic amide are obtained with a lateral resolution of 100 nm. Simultaneously a force image is measured that gives the topography. Therefore it is possible to correlate a high-resolution fluorescence micrograph with the topological structure of the polymer film. Polymer domains that do not fluoresce are visible in the force image, while polarization dependence, an optical property not afforded by atomic force microscopy, is clearly demonstrated with a high resolution in the near-field optical image. This combination of fluorescence scanning near field optical microscopy and force microscopy provides additional information o­n the structure of the polymer film that can be valuable in the research of Langmuir-Blodgett films.
Printable version