Optical Sciences

Biomolecules and nanostructures

The Optical Sciences group studies the interaction of light and matter at the nanoscale. We do this by exploring ways to shape light and its environment. It's what we call active and passive control. Our current focus is on the interaction of light with biomolecules and nanostructures. We are part of Twente University's Department of Science and Technology and member of the MESA+ institute.
We participate in the EU-COST actions MP1102: Coherent Raman microscopy (MicroCor) and CM1202: Supramolecular photocatalytic water splitting (PERSPECT-H2O)

 

Skin penetration behavior of lipid-core nanocapsules for simultaneous delivery of resveratrol and curcumin

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Rossana B. Friedrich, Birthe Kann, Karine Coradini, Herman L. Offerhaus, Ruy C.R. Beck, Maike Windbergs
European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
vol. 78 p. 204–213, oct. 12, 2015
doi:10.1016/j.ejps.2015.07.018

Polyphenols, which are secondary plant metabolites, gain increasing research interest due to their therapeutic potential. Among them, resveratrol and curcumin are two agents showing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial as well as anticarcinogenic effects. In addition to their individual therapeutic effect, increased activity was reported upon co-delivery of the two compounds. However, due to the poor water solubility of resveratrol and curcumin, their clinical application is currently limited. In this context, lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) composed of an oily core surrounded by a polymeric shell were introduced as drug carrier systems with the potential to overcome this obstacle. Furthermore, the encapsulation of polyphenols into LNC can increase their photostability. As the attributes of the polyphenols make them excellent candidates for skin treatment, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of co-delivery of resveratrol and curcumin by LNC upon topical application on excised human skin. In contrast to the formulation with one polyphenol, resveratrol penetrated into deeper skin layers when the co-formulation was applied. Based on vibrational spectroscopy analysis, these effects are most likely due to interactions of curcumin and the stratum corneum, facilitating the skin absorption of the co-administered resveratrol. Furthermore, the interaction of LNC with primary human skin cells was analyzed encountering a cellular uptake within 24 h potentially leading to intracellular effects of the polyphenols. Thus, the simultaneous delivery of resveratrol and curcumin by LNC provides an intelligent way for immediate and sustained polyphenol delivery for skin disease treatment.
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